FotoFest 2012 focuses on Russian Contemporary Photography

Mikola Gnisyuk, People in Trees (The Rooks Have Arrived), 1964.

FotoFest, the longest running photography biennial in the United States (going on fourteen years this year) has announced that this year’s edition will focus on Russian photography, with a three-pronged exhibition program: After Stalin, “The Thaw”, The Re-emergence of the Personal Voice – The late 1950s–1970s  This section draws heavily from the Novator collection and the Lumiere Brothers Center to present a historic grounding for some of the more contemporary work. Perestroika, Liberalization and Experimentation – The mid/late 1980s–2010 revisits the identity politics of the Perestroika era, which, according to the curators, extends up until last year. This exhibition is split into two parts, with selections by Olga Chernysheva, Boris Mikhailov, AES+F, and Evgeny Yufit, among others. The last section, straightforwardly dubbed The Young Generation takes a risk with some very young talent indeed,  with works by photographers like Anna Skladmann and Tatiana Antonuk.

The exhibitions will be on view from March 16 – April 29, 2012, in Houston, Texas. For more information, please check the  FotoFest website.

Tatiana Antonuk, Untitled, 2011. From the series Alienation.

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3 Responses to FotoFest 2012 focuses on Russian Contemporary Photography

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